Wonder Woman Saves Hollywood

Brook Altman
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I only have two words to say about Hollywood, “Wonder Woman.”  There are heroes and now she’roes leading at the box office since “Wonder Woman” slayed it opening weekend setting the record for a film directed by a woman. Patty Jenkins, we bow.

The thing I think is so important to always keep in mind about her is how positive and bright and shiny she is. - Patty Jenkins

The hit lassoed a staggering $223 million globally and conquered over $100 million domestically in the first weekend.  It took decades to get this movie off the ground, because Hollywood couldn’t get the formula right until Patty Jenkins came on.

Jenkins took cues from Richard Donner who brought us the landmark 1978 comic-book movie “Superman,” capturing that good, old-fashioned action-adventure that wasn’t afraid to make room for warmth, humor and romance.  Donner nailed it and Jenkins improved upon it.  Jenkins told Rolling Stone, “The thing I think is so important to always keep in mind about her, is how positive and bright and shiny she is….To have such pure response come back from people talking about heroes, talking about the future, talking about love—that blows my mind.”

What You Need to Know Before You Go:

Wonder Woman was created in 1941 by William Moulton Marston, psychologist, Harvard Law graduate, feminist theorist and originator of the lie detector test.  It is said that the inspiration for the character came from Marston’s wife, Elizabeth, and Olive Byrne. Both women were in a polyamorous relationship with Marston.

Princess Diana of Themyscira carried The Golden Lasso of Truth, a fictional weapon Marston created as an allegory for feminine charm and a woman’s ability to discern the truth.  It was created by Marston as a direct result of his research into emotions and was more about submission than truth.  The lariat forces anyone it captures into submission; compelling its captives to obey the wielder of the lasso and tell the truth.

In a 1943 issue of The American Scholar, Marston said:

“Not even girls want to be girls so long as our feminine archetype lacks force, strength and power.  Not wanting to be girls, they don’t want to be tender, submissive, peace-loving as good women are.  Women’s strong qualities have become despised because of their weakness.  The obvious remedy is to create a feminine character with all the strength of Superman, plus all the allure of a good and beautiful woman.”

It’s imperative we all go out and support this film that so strongly represents powerful women at the helm.  Wonder Woman is a feminist icon, a character admired for her wisdom, her kindness and her strength.  However, it is a wonderful attribute to the power of the female ability to tell the truth, trusting our gut and honoring it.

Linda Carter attended the premier looking stunning as ever and Gadot bowed in her honor.  “Wonder Woman” stars, Gal Gadot, Chris PineRobin Wright, Connie Nielsen, David Thewlis, Danny Huston and Elena Anaya.

Brook Altman is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Prowdr.com. To learn more about how this extraordinary LGBTQ lifestyle website came into being, check out Welcome to Prowdr.

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